Blog Archives

Misheard lyrics and mondegreens

Jule Styne (writer of ‘Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend’, ‘Three Coins in a Fountain’, and ‘Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!’) famously said: “A song without words is just a piece of music.” The singer’s job is

Posted in Performance skills

Taking a step back after a performance

After a performance, we may go through a whole range of feelings. We need to allow those to subside before we do any serious evaluation of our performance. We should assume that we will experience one or all of …

Posted in Performance skills, Psychology

Open Mic nights in Oxford

Not all the Open Mic nights in Oxford are listed on Daily Info, but it is definitely the most reliable source of information. Some of this information was gathered from here and Open Mic Finder, but may not be accurate

Posted in Performance skills

A to J model of singing

My singing students are well acquainted with my teaching model for singing lessons, and this summary is a reminder for them of the core concepts. It serves as a draft outline of a book I would like to write about what

Posted in Aligning, Interpretation, Learning & teaching, Models & Maps, Performance skills, Psychology Tagged with: , , , , ,

Singing at Drama College Auditions

What are they looking for? (NB Check the section ‘College Advice’) “Is my singing voice OK? What if I can’t hold a tune?” Wrong questions! This audition is not about the beauty of your singing voice, or your level of

Posted in Auditioning, Performance skills

Clearing breaths

Whether learning, singing or performing, we function better when our minds are not distracted by anxiety, and when we can feel completely present physically, mentally and emotionally. The following exercise can help us achieve and sustain equanimity.

Posted in Exercises, Performance skills, Psychology Tagged with: ,

Learning from our performances

A post-performance evaluation exercise It has been said that there is no such thing as failure, or a mistake, just opportunities for learning. This is a method for how to learn from a past event that you have been involved

Posted in Learning & teaching, Performance skills, Psychology